Friday, 16 June 2017

These boots aren't made for walking

Boots: L to R Mammut (newest),  Scarpa, Loveson
My lifestyle is probably tougher on boots than most people's; particularly in winter, but actually all year round. Consequently I've had (and worn out) a lot of pairs of boots. Three years ago I went into Tiso's mountaineering shop on Buchannan Street and asked for their strongest pair; they sold me a pair of Mammut boots, which I've worn ever since. But they're reaching the end of their life and it's time to decide what to wear next.

So I've been thinking a lot about why boots fail, and critically examining those old boots which I've not thrown away. The pair I wore before the Mammuts were by Scarpa, similar to these. They also lasted about three years. Prior to that I had a succession of pairs of Timberland boots much like this, which were light and comfortable (and much cheaper) but which wore out in nine months to a year. I've a much older pair of Loveson boots - bought more than thirty years ago while I was an undergraduate, and worn regularly for fifteen of those years; and still with some life in them.

So what causes these boots to fail? What do you look for in a boot which makes for durability?

Mammut boots: mainly good condition after three years wear,
but Vibram sole has delaminated and is falling apart.
My Mammuts are failing principally because the soles - by Vibram - are delaminating and falling apart. Consequently the boots are no longer stable, which is both uncomfortable and potentially risky on broken ground.

The uppers are also beginning to show cracks across just below the end of the tongue, but that's at least partly because once the soles started to come to bits I stopped taking care of the uppers.

The splendidly deep welts are still adhering to the upper all the way round; the boots are still waterproof and are still extremely comfortable; and the original laces have only recently worn through.

Vibram soles seem widely used on high end boots, but in recent years they've become much more complicated with many more layers, and these layers don't seem to be stuck together very well. Mind you; these may be a poor batch. But I think that Scottish winter conditions - always wet, rarely frosty, and with sharp rocks and gritty soils - are pretty tough on these over-complex multi-layer constructions where a funky, high-tech appearance seems to take priority over function. So for my next boots, I'll seek to avoid Vibram.

Left hand Scarpa boot, showing
damage to the upper.
The Scarpas were bought about six years ago, and were worn regularly for three years. They're mostly good, but have failed on the inner side of the left boot. The leather/Goretex sandwich cracked through just above the welt, allowing water and mud into the boot. The welt - much lower than on the Mammuts - also didn't adhere so well to the upper, and is loose in several places. Apart from that, they're still comfortable, and have some dry-weather wear left in them. Their soles are also Vibram-branded, but if they have a complex multi-layer construction its well hidden and well protected. There's no damage to the sole, apart from acceptable wear.

Both the Mammuts and the Scarpas were made in Romania. The quality of construction of both pairs - despite the issues I've described above - is generally very good.

I haven't kept any of the Timberlands, because they weren't worth it. The thin leather fairly quickly wears through into holes where the toe flexes, and as I recall there were also often problems with the welts and with the the soles, but they're relatively cheap and you get what you pay for.

Loveson boots, bought about 1984 and still good.
The Loveson boots are a quality apart. After many years of hard wear, they still have live in them. The tread on the soles is completely worn away, and they've always been a little loose in the heel for my feet, but nothing has failed. These boots don't have a Goretex membrane, but with dubbin they're adequately waterproof.

Unfortunately it seems Loveson no longer make walking boots, but these have taken a lot more wear than either the Scarpas or the Mammuts.

As a temporary measure I've bought a pair of Chinese made Karrimor boots simply because they were cheap in a sale - but they're not very good and I doubt they'll last; they're also rather stiff and uncomfortable to walk in, and too narrow for my feet. I'm looking for another pair of quality boots. I'd be inclined to buy another pair of Scarpas, but this year's model seem to have one of those over-complicated laminated Vibram soles.

The deep welt on the Mammuts certainly helps protect the sides of the upper from cuts and wear; they've been good and comfortable boots. But both Scarpa and Mammut are expensive; if they do last three years then they cost about the same per month as Timberlands. I want a boot that can survive longer, but I don't know where I'm going to find it.
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